Refusing Carcerality: A Public Roundtable

British International Studies Association

Monday, June 12, 2023 - 18:00
Bush House Lecture Theatre 1, 30 Aldwych, London WC2B 4BG
From the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Act and the Nationality and Borders Act in the UK, to the recent ‘anti-rave’ policies proposed by the new far-right government in Italy and the expansion of EU border regimes in Ceuta and Melilla; from the resistance in Nigeria against the brutal SARS police unit, and recent hunger strikes by Palestinian and Egyptian political prisoners, to the wider BLM movements around the world – the logic of carcerality, witnessed through immigration detention, imprisonment, militarised policing, and punishment, is a growing feature of international politics and political economy...and so is the resistance to it.
 
The conversations at this public roundtable, Refusing carcerality, will aim to encourage an interrogation of carcerality at the multiple scales through which these modes of violence and dispossession shape and structure everyday life (and vice versa). At the same time, organisers hope to cultivate new ways of understanding and strengthening the creative, collective praxis required to refuse them.
 
Speakers
  • Riya l’Sanah, PhD candidate at the Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies, University of Exeter; former director of Who Profits Research Center. 
  • Gargi Bhattacharya, Professor of Sociology, University of East London 
  • Adam Elliott-Cooper, Lecturer in Public and Social Policy, Queen Mary University of London
  • Shanice Octavia McBean, Writer and activist in Sisters Uncut 
  • Stuart Schrader, Associate Research Professor of Africana Studies, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore
  • Aaron Winter, Senior Lecturer in Sociology (Race and Anti-Racism), Lancaster University
 
The roundtable will be co-hosted by our Colonial, Postcolonial, and Decolonial (CPD) Working Group and the School of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary, University of London, and is open to the public.
 
Organisers are thankful to funding from BISA, the School of Politics and Economics at King’s College London, and the School of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary University of London. Thanks are also extended for the support provided by King's Department of International Development.

© 2024 Stuart Schrader