Epistemological Impossibilities

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Community policing is a confusing term. It joins together two of the most ambiguous words in the English language. Despite this ambiguity, its power resides not in what it purports to mean—a partnership of the police agencies and the people they protect forged through the fluid exchange of intelligence from the latter to the former—but in what it reveals about the purpose and mechanism of the police-led fabrication of social order. Here are some thoughts about why we should be wary not simply of community policing but of community itself.

Monday, August 1, 2016

Over the past couple weeks, I've published some new articles. Most importantly, Humanity has published my article "To Secure the Global Great Society: Participation in Pacification." This is my first sole-authored peer-reviewed journal article, and it's in one of my favorite journals, so I'm very excited about it. The article grows out of a chapter of my dissertation, and it also continues some of the research and thinking that first appeared in a journal article and a book chapter that I co-authored with Ananya Roy and Emma Shaw Crane.

Here is the abstract:

The U.S. federal mandate of community participation, which defined the social-welfare programming of the Great Society’s War on Poverty, was recapitulated in U.S. foreign aid through Title IX of the 1966 Foreign Assistance Act. Many agencies adhered to this mandate, including, surprisingly, those concerned with counterinsurgency in South Vietnam. This article, therefore, inquires into the mechanics of pacification, demonstrating that the population whose security was at stake was responsible for its own participation in achieving security. By placing the linkage between community development and security in a transnational frame, this article shows that pacification must be considered a productive, not simply destructive, form of governance.

The article has several goals, all organized by an insistence on placing US domestic governance and US overseas rule in a single analytic frame.

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

In the spring semester of 2016, I taught a seminar in the Harvard History Department called The History of Policing in the United States. It was a wonderful experience, chiefly because of the brilliant and hard-working students. In one of the first weeks of the seminar, we read the famous "Broken Windows" article by George Kelling and James Q. Wilson from The Atlantic Monthly, published in 1982, as well as a critique of it published soon thereafter by Samuel Walker in Justice Quarterly. Over the semester, the class discussions continually referred to issues these articles raised, about police tactics, police philosophy, police reform, and the uses of history to shape, legitimize, and critique policing.

As I was preparing for our initial discussion of these readings, and because I was also writing a short article on broken windows policing at the time (in Harvard Design Magazine), I found it necessary to do some parsing of muddy terms. The terms are Broken Windows, Quality of Life, Zero Tolerance, Stop and Frisk, and Order Maintenance.

Past Talks

Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations Annual Meeting

Thursday, June 23, 2016 - 11:45am
Room A, Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice at the University of San Diego
Panel: The Color of Modernization: American Racial Politics and International Development

Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations

Thursday, June 25, 2015 - 11:45am
Salon 2, Renaissance Arlington Capital View, Arlington, VA
Panel: Cold War Urbanism: Social Science, Urban Development and the Superpowers

American Studies Association Annual Meeting

Thursday, November 6, 2014 - 2:00pm
Westin Bonaventure, San Gabriel A
Panel: What Comes of Fury? Responses to California’s 1960s and 1970s Urban Crisis




Humanity: An International Journal of Human Rights, Humanitarianism, and Development
Volume 7, Issue 2, 2016
Territories of Poverty: Rethinking North and South
Coauthors: Ananya Roy & Emma Shaw Crane

© 2016 Stuart Schrader